Studying the neurobiology of stimulant and alcohol abuse and dependence in genetically manipulated mice

Stephens, D N, Mead, A N and Ripley, Tamzin (2002) Studying the neurobiology of stimulant and alcohol abuse and dependence in genetically manipulated mice. Behavioural Pharmacology, 13 (5-6). pp. 327-345. ISSN 0955-8810

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Abstract

The ability to manipulate the genetic makeup of organisms by specific targeting of selected genes has provided a novel means of investigating the neurobiological mechanisms underlying drug abuse and dependence. However, as with other techniques, there are a number of potential pitfalls in the use of genetically manipulated animals (usually mice) in behavioural experiments. This review discusses the techniques involved in creating genetically manipulated mice, and points to opportunities and insights into addictive processes provided by the new science, while illustrating some of the potential problems encountered in interpretation of data obtained from such animals. The use of the mouse as an experimental animal also raises some specific problems which limit the usefulness of the technique at present. Examples taken from research into alcohol and psychostimulant abuse and dependence are used to illustrate the usefulness of genetically manipulated animals in addiction research, the problems of interpretation which sometimes arise, and how techniques are being developed to overcome present limitations to this exciting area of research.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: abuse, dependence, alcohol, cocaine, amphetamine, transgenic, knockout, knockin, mouse
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Depositing User: Dai Stephens
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 15:33
Last Modified: 29 Mar 2017 10:08
URI: http://srodev.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/13267
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