Are worksite interventions effective in increasing physical activity? A systematic review and meta-analysis

Abraham, Charles and Graham-Rowe, Ella (2009) Are worksite interventions effective in increasing physical activity? A systematic review and meta-analysis. Health Psychology Review, 3 (1). pp. 108-144. ISSN 1743-7199

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Abstract

Worksite interventions have the potential to reach a broad and captive audience and overcome one of the most widely cited barriers to increasing physical activity (PA), namely, a lack of time. A systematic review and random effects, meta-analysis assessed the effectiveness of worksite interventions to enhance PA. Thirty-seven intervention evaluations reporting 55 unique interventions met our inclusion criteria. Results indicate that, overall, worksite interventions have small, positive effects on PA and this effect is smaller when fitness, as opposed to self-report, outcome measures are reported (ds = 0.15 versus 0.23). Worksite interventions targeting PA specifically as opposed to general lifestyle change were found to be more effective whether evaluated in terms of increased fitness (0.29 versus 0.08) or increased self-reported PA (0.27 versus 0.14). Those promoting walking as opposed to other forms of PA were also more effective (0.54 versus 0.16). Interventions providing individually tailored information or instructions were not found to be more effective, but there was evidence that specific goal setting and goal review techniques may enhance fitness gains.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Depositing User: Charles Abraham
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 15:37
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2012 15:55
URI: http://srodev.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/13602
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