Fear appeals and binge drinking: a terror management theory perspective

Jessop, Donna C and Wade, Jennifer (2008) Fear appeals and binge drinking: a terror management theory perspective. British Journal of Health Psychology, 13 (4). pp. 773-788. ISSN 1359-107X

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The aim of the current research was to test the terror management theory-derived hypotheses that exposure to information about the mortality-related risks of binge drinking would make mortality salient (Study 1) and, hence, exacerbate willingness to binge drink amongst those who perceive this behaviour to benefit self-esteem (Study 2). STUDY 1: Participants (N=97) were allocated to one of five experimental conditions. Results confirmed that exposure to information about the mortality-related risks of binge drinking made mortality salient. STUDY 2: Participants (N=296) were allocated to one of three experimental conditions. Exposure to mortality-related information about the risks of binge drinking was found to result in greater willingness to binge drink among (i) binge drinkers and (ii) non-binge drinkers who perceived this behaviour to benefit self-esteem. There was no evidence, however, that exposure to such information influenced binge drinking over the following week. CONCLUSIONS: Research findings suggest that mortality-related health promotion campaigns might inadvertently make mortality salient, and hence precipitate the very behaviours which they aim to deter among some recipients

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Depositing User: Donna Jessop
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 15:45
Last Modified: 30 Nov 2012 10:09
URI: http://srodev.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/14209
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