Women students and the London medical schools 1914-39: The anatomy of a masculine culture

Dyhouse, Carol (1998) Women students and the London medical schools 1914-39: The anatomy of a masculine culture. Gender and History, 10 (1). pp. 110-132. ISSN 0953-5233

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Abstract

During the First World War in Britain, women were exhorted to rally to the nation's need and to train as doctors. A number of the London medical schools opened their doors to female students for the first time. After the war, several of these schools reverted to their former status as exclusively male institutions. This article looks at these events in some detail, focusing on the controversies over co-education in medicine and attempting to unravel some of the issues and politics involved. It is suggested that the gender politics which characterise these debates illuminate our understanding of the social history of work cultures and masculinity in the period.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of History, Art History and Philosophy > History
Subjects: D History General and Old World > DA History of Great Britain > DA020 England
Depositing User: Carol Dyhouse
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2012 19:08
Last Modified: 15 Oct 2012 11:57
URI: http://srodev.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/19353
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