Initiation of therapy with a subcutaneously administered antiretroviral in treatment-experienced HIV-infected patients: understanding physician and patient perspectives

Horne, Rob, Cooper, Vanessa and Fisher, Martin (2008) Initiation of therapy with a subcutaneously administered antiretroviral in treatment-experienced HIV-infected patients: understanding physician and patient perspectives. AIDS Care, 20 (9). pp. 1029-1038. ISSN 0954-0121

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Abstract

Enfuvirtide (Fuzeon) is the first self-injectable antiretroviral (ARV) therapy approved for the treatment of HIV. This study was undertaken to explore the perceptions of injectable ARVs among physicians and treatment-experienced HIV-infected patients and identify potential motivators or barriers to the initiation of injectable ARV therapies. This empirical study was conducted based on qualitative field research conducted in multiple centres in five European countries and the US. A purposive sampling strategy was employed and structured interviews carried out with physicians and patients. Discussion guides for these interviews focused on attitudinal responses to a range of key areas. For physicians, these areas included HIV treatment, treatment-experienced patients and their relationships with them and injectable therapy usage, while for patients - some of whom were receiving enfuvirtide therapy - the focus included relationships with their physicians and attitudes towards injectable ARV therapy. Sixty-eight physicians and 43 patients were interviewed. Qualitative analysis of the interview responses revealed a number of recurring themes among physician and patient perceptions of HIV and its treatment. Physicians tended to view injectable ARVs as a last resort, with only limited suitability among treatment-experienced patients and a low level of patient acceptability. In contrast, patients generally perceived the potential value of effective injectable ARV therapy, if recommended to them by their physicians, indicating that its benefits could outweigh the drawbacks associated with its administration. This study identified some potential disconnects between physician and patient perceptions of injectable therapy. Our findings emphasize the need for patients to discuss their treatment goals with their physicians so that they can work together to find the regimen that is most likely to achieve these goals.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Brighton and Sussex Medical School
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0109 Infectious and parasitic diseases
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Depositing User: Ellen Thomas
Date Deposited: 05 Aug 2013 13:11
Last Modified: 05 Aug 2013 13:11
URI: http://srodev.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/45619
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