Predictors of pregnancy and changes in pregnancy incidence among HIV-positive women accessing HIV clinical care

Huntington, Susie E, Fisher, Martin, The National Study of HIV in Pregnancy and Childhood (NSHPC), and The UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (UK CHIC), (2013) Predictors of pregnancy and changes in pregnancy incidence among HIV-positive women accessing HIV clinical care. AIDS, 27 (1). pp. 95-103. ISSN 0269-9370

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Abstract

Objectives: To describe predictors of pregnancy and changes in pregnancy incidence among HIV-positive women accessing HIV clinical care.

Methods: Data were obtained through the linkage of two separate studies: the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort study (UK CHIC), a cohort of adults attending 13 large HIV clinics; and the National Study of HIV in Pregnancy and Childhood (NSHPC), a national surveillance study of HIV-positive pregnant women. Pregnancy incidence was measured using the proportion of women in UK CHIC with a pregnancy reported to NSHPC. Generalized estimating equations were used to identify predictors of pregnancy and assess changes in pregnancy incidence in 2000–2009.

Results: The number of women accessing care at UK CHIC sites increased as did the number of pregnancies. Older women were less likely to have a pregnancy [adjusted relative rate (aRR) 0.44 per 10 year increment in age, [95% confidence interval (CI) (0.41–0.46)], P < 0.001] as were women with CD4 cell count less than 200 cells/μl compared with CD4 cell count 200–350 cells/μl [aRR 0.65 (0.55–0.77), P < 0.001] and women of white ethnicity compared with women of black African ethnicity [aRR 0.67 (0.57–0.80), P < 0.001]. The likelihood that women had a pregnancy increased over the study period [aRR 1.05 (1.03–1.07), P < 0.001). The rate of change did not significantly differ according to age group, antiretroviral therapy use, CD4 group or ethnicity.

Conclusion: The pregnancy rate among women accessing HIV clinical care increased in 2000–2009. HIV-positive women with, or planning, a pregnancy require a high level of care and this is likely to continue and increase as more women of older age have pregnancies.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Brighton and Sussex Medical School
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0109 Infectious and parasitic diseases
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Depositing User: Ellen Thomas
Date Deposited: 20 Aug 2013 07:57
Last Modified: 20 Aug 2013 07:57
URI: http://srodev.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/45903
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