Regulating ‘respect’ for the embryo: social mindscapes and human embryonic stem cell research in Japan

Sleeboom-Faulkner, Margaret (2013) Regulating ‘respect’ for the embryo: social mindscapes and human embryonic stem cell research in Japan. Science Technology and Society, 18 (3). pp. 361-377. ISSN 0971-7218

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Abstract

This article explores the relationship between the science community and the bioethical regulation of human embryonic stem cell research (hESR) in the laboratory and in daily life in Japan. It develops a perspective that takes into account the diversity of views among principle investigators (PIs) and scientists working in the laboratory. Deploying Eviatar Zerubavel’s notion of social mindscapes and the notion of mindsets, I elucidate the relationships between the personal and the professional, scientists and the public. Introducing the concept of mindset switching, I argue that scientists’ views of embryonic substances cannot be understood adequately in terms of the rhetoric of boundary making alone. The use of cognitive notions of social mindscape applied to situations in the life of scientists has far-reaching consequences for both the implementation of research regulation involving respect for the embryo and for the public discussion on the use of embryonic substances. The article is based on interviews with over thirty scientists working with embryos and stem cells during fieldwork visits in eleven science institutes in Japan.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Global Studies > Anthropology
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation
Depositing User: Nadya Herrera Catalan
Date Deposited: 09 Nov 2015 09:53
Last Modified: 09 Nov 2015 09:53
URI: http://srodev.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/57807
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